Diary is our daily update of things we love and see and appreciate and, and, and...
Tinaa
Tinaa





Declan O’Neill

London-based photographer Declan O’Neill’s ongoing series captures celebratory bonfires in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“Hundreds of unregulated bonfires are constructed like this and in the early summer months the terrain vague erupts with these pyre-like sculptures,” says O’Neill, who has photographed the piles prior to burning for the past six years. “They have been likened to giant beehives and many mimic the stupas and pagodas of Burma and Thailand.”

I love it!

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Helen Sear is that kind of person that I admire. She looks deeply and with sinsitivity at the sourrounding, and gives a strong and poetic message of her point of view through beautiful images. Love the “Inside the view” series. More on her website, have a look!

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Arnar Ómarsson

Arnar Ómarsson has the kind of simpaty towards the world that just transforms what he sees and experiences into short stories told through pictures, drawings, constructions. The kind of simpaty i admire (a lot) and consider absolutly genial. Lovely the tree project, such as simmetry landscapes..

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Recently i went to Venice for the Biennale, i loved this work from Lee Yong Baek, for the Korean Pavillion.
Angel Soldier is a video performance in what appears to be a floral landscape, set to the calm sounds of nature. At first sight, it seems to be a still image, but upon closer inspection, the heavily florid picture separates before the eyes as an optical illusion, revealing three-dimensional flowers in the foreground and, behind, a soldier slowly creeping along, masked in the print’s camouflage.

via designboom

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Trisha Brown

Trisha Brown is the most widely acclaimed choreographer to emerge from the postmodern era. She first came to public notice when she began showing her work with the Judson Dance Theater in the 1960s.
Watching Walking on the Wall, a 1971 work, is an extraordinary experience. The dancers, held parallel to the floor by unobtrusive harnesses that slide on tracks, almost glide. Spurning gravity, they never look down as they put one foot in front of another, step around corners, meet and part. Seen from the balcony of the Barbican, it’s like watching life on the street: people strolling alone and in pairs, holding hands. Then you notice the other spectators in the well of the space below, looking up.
Three Brown works from the 1970s are performed every hour, throughout the day, in Pioneers of the Downtown Scene, a look at art and life in New York’s SoHo during the 1970s.(at the Barbican, London).

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Yayoi Kusama

I have never been too much into dots, but the video above, which was taken from the BBC special, Japanorama, has a kind of calm and innocent halo. It’s a great look at her life and career in 5 minutes, which should be enough to get you interested in who she is. If you already know who she is then you’re sure to enjoy this brief glimpse into her amazing life. Life is dot, today!

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Daniel Arsham

His work starts from two dimension, with drawings depicting animals interacting with modernist structures, and ends with the 4th dimension. In this step he interacts with coreographer and dancers who gave to his performances a high level of drama and visual expression. The surfaces of walls appear to melt, erode and ripple. Animals contemplate the emergence of floating shapes in nature, signals of human progress or an entropic future are shown. Besides this, Daniel’s practice explore also existing spaces and the way they can be modified. In collaboration with other artists and designers, Snarkitecture practice focuses on the investigation of structure, material and program and how these elements can be manipulated to serve new and imaginative purposes. In these days at the storefront for art and architecture in New York it’s possible to see his last performance, DIG.

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Kate MacDowell

There’s something that attracts me in the sculptures of Kate. Probably it’s the materic aspects of them. Porcelain reminds me echoes of romance, and its snow-white color has an halo of innocence which clashes somehow with the figures and theme of the sculptures. These pieces are in part responses to environmental stressors including climate change, toxic pollution, and gm crops, which is of course the most important matter nowadays, also looking at the facts happening in Japan right now. By the way, we had the chance to change things in 2009, at the international Conference on the climate change in Copenhagen, but we missed it. So, thanks Kate to reminds us how much we are destroying our planet.

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Hippy Shit

Hippy Shit is a bi-annual independently curated and published by Bryan Dalton and Alex Harris about pyschedelic field trip, featuring contributions from the most inspiring creatives in the game. It also has a series of limited edition prints coming this spring, so keep your eyes peeled…

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